S4E09: Time in the field with Denise Herzing

Claudia talks to Denise Herzing about her decades of fieldwork with Atlantic Spotted Dolphins in the Bahamas. They touch on some of what she has learnt about dolphins in the wild and the ways in which they communicate using sound. They also talk about the significance and challenges of doing extended field studies.

About Denise Herzing

Denise Herzing is the Founder and Research Director of the Wild Dolphin Project. Denise has spent decades working with Atlantic spotted dolphins in Bahamian waters. She has a B.S. in Marine Zoology, an M.A. in Behavioral Biology and a Ph.D. in Behavioral Biology/Environmental Studies. Denise is an Affiliate Assistant Professor in Biological Sciences at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, Florida. In addition to becoming a Guggenheim Fellow in 2008, Denise is a fellow with the Explorers Club, a scientific advisor for the Lifeboat Foundation and the American Cetacean Society, and on the board of Schoolyard Films. Over and above her numerous academic articles, Denise is the author of Dolphin Diaries: My 25 years with Spotted Dolphins in the Bahamas and The Wild Dolphin Project as well as the co-editor of Dolphin Communication and Cognition. You can learn more about Denise and her on the Wild Dolphin Project Website.

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Recorded: 23 March 2022

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Featured:

The Wild Dolphin Project by Denise Herzing; The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau; The Dolphin Defender by Hardy Jones; all sound files were supplied by Denise Herzing; Ogre-Faced, Net-Casting Spiders Use Auditory Cues to Detect Airborne Prey by Jay Strafstrom et al.

Thank you to Animals in Philosophy, Politics, Law and Ethics (A.P.P.L.E) for sponsoring this podcast; the Sonic Arts Studio and the Sonic Arts of Place Laboratory (SAPLab) for sponsoring this season; Gordon Clarke (Instagram: @_con_sol_) for the bed music, Jeremy John (Website) for the logo, and Hannah Hunter for the Animal Highlight